title
Flaming Gorge Reservoir and Green River post-impoundment investigations : annual progress report 1974-1975
author
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abstract
UDWR Publication Number 76-2
date
1976-01-01
organization
Utah. Division of Wildlife Resources
species
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)r N 4650F6 . 13: Fla/1?t//C/7S' • FLAMING 00:IG: RESERVOIR AND GREEN RIVER Annual Progress Feport 1974 - 1975 Publication Nurroer 76-2 Dingell-Johnson Project Numer F-28-R-3 [email protected] TJI'AH S'rATE DIVISICN OF WILDLIFE RESOUICES 1976 AA equal opportunity Dtployer John E. Phelps Director ANNUAL PERFORMANCE REPORT State: U l' AH -------- Project Title:- Colorad0-Rive Drainage and Tailwaters Fisheries Management, Investigation and Surveys Project" No: F-28-R-3 Job No: l ------- Period Covered: P. S. Objective: Segment Objective: Job Title: July 1, 1973 to February 24, 1975 Fish Harvest, Fish Population To determine the magnitude and nature of the harvest, the trends of the fish populations and their dynamics, food utilization by resident fishes and changes in the aquatic habitat. FLAMING GORGE RESERVOIR 1. To determine the magnitude and nature of the annual fish harvest. Fla.ming Gorge National Recreation area experienced a decrease in visitor use during 1974. Estimated visitor use for 1974 was 652,800 visitor days (one visitor day equals l2 hours), 8.7 percent below the 1973 figure (U.S. Forest Service, unpublished data). Economic in- stability and increases in fuel costs are believed to b~ the basic causes -of the decline. Although the numbers of fish- ermen decreased, their length of stey increased creating an overall increase in angler use. The mean fisherman length of stay in the National Recreation Area increased from 1.9 deys in 1973 to 2. 5 days in 1974. The length of the fishi~ day varied between census areas but the overall mean fish- erman day was 4.o hours. Tra.:ffic classification and use expansion factors were determined by roadblocks and traffic COtUlters on major acess roads. Area pressure, angler days, hours and harvest were determined from data collected during angler interviews. The catch rate decreased from the 0.57 fish per hour rate recorded for 1973 to 0.49 fish per hour in 1974, but angler use increased 23.3 percent to provide an estimated harvest of 799.137 trout, a 3.0 percent increase over 1973. Creel data for the past ll years are summarized in Table II. Reasons for the decrease in catch rate are difficult to ascertain. The major decline in catch rate occured af'ter the ice went out. Catch rate during the ice fishing season (January - March) was an excellent 0.96 fish per hour but decreased markedly to o.44 fish per hour during April. Catch rate slowly increased during summer and fall. Poor spring and early summer weather conditions mey have been a factor. Page 2 Table I. 1974 Flaming Gorge Reservoir creel census summary with 1973 figures in pai:_entheses .!.. -Percen__:!;ages ine!_icate ch~ge ave~ 1973. _ Area Canyon Open Hills Inflow Total Boat Shore Boat Shore Angler Days Angler Hours 114,483 (93,462) +22.5"/o 413,710 (370,645) +11.6"/o 252,068 +27.7°/o (197,423) . 1,o49,472 +24.9% .. (839,924) . -49,794 +32.2"/o - 205,763 +44.2"/o (37,658) (142,658) - 416,345 (328,543) +26.7% 1,668,944 (1,353,277) +23.'51/o Boat - Shore Fishing Relationship 256,781 +25.4% (2o4,689) 159,564 +28.8"/o (123,854) 1,o60,553 +20.8"/o (877,764) 608,391 +28.0% (475,463) Fish/hour by Area and Boat - Shore Canyon Open Hills 0.55 0.56 (0.82) (0.56) o.44 0.38 ( 0.67) (0.41) Fish/Hour 0.51 (0.77) 0.50 ( 0.52) 0.33 ( o.4o) o.49 (0.57) 0.53 (0.63) 0.39 (0.47) Harvest 209,833 -26.2"/o (284,431) 521,368 +19.9% (434,698) 67,936 +19. 6% (56,815) - 799,137 + 3. 0% (775,944) 561,123 +l.2"/o (554,388) 238,014 +7.4% (221,556) Inflow 0.32 (0.46) 0.35 (0.33) Page 3 Table II. Harvest statistics for rainbow trout, Flaming Gorge Reservoir, 1964-1974. Year Total Harvest Catch Rate Total Hours Total Anglers 1964 676,686 1.23 549,437 167,300 1965 800,657 1.28 623,761 191,619 1966 793,665 o. 78 1,010,599 266,473 1967 710,000 0.62 1,151,000 3o6,ooo 1968 537,500 0.58 921,000 254,300 1969 540,000 0.56 958,000 257,900 1970 367,463 o.44 833,466 231,695 1971 282,401 o.4o 714,648 190,702 1972 646,900 0.60 1,072,865 270,370 1973 775,944 0.57 1,353,227 328,453 1974 799,137 o.49 1,660,944 416,345 Segment Objective: Page 4 The reservoir (Figure 1) filled to capacity (1841 m, 6o4o ft. msl) during 1974 creating expanded, productive fishing areas. Mean size of creeled fish was 323 mm - (12.7In.) and 389 gm (0.86 lb.). Trout over ten- pounds were relatively common with an occasional 20 lb. trophy taken. Three "lu.nker" brown trout, ( 25 lbs., 29 lbs., 8 oz., and 31 lbs., 12 oz.) were taken from Falming Gorge during 1974 and early 1975. Rainbow trout dominated the catch comprising 97.1 percent while brown trout accounted for 1.9 percent and cutthroat, lake trout, Utah chub, carp, and a few smallmouth and largemouth bass comprised the remaining 1.0 percent. Most brown trout were taken during the fall when they represented up to 7.0 percent of the creel. 2. Determine the size, composition, and trends of fish populations and define movements and reproduction. To continue assessment of population trends in the reservoir, experimental gill nets were set in April, August, and November of 1974. Utah chub continued to be the most numerous species netted (Table II~. Catches of rainbow and brown trout were similar to previous years. White suckers appear to be increasing in all areas of the reservoir. In addition to experimental gill nets, a purse seine, sampling about one surface acre (0.405 hectare) was used by Wyoming Gaine and Fish personnel in June, 1974, to sample the pelagic fish populations in all areas of the reservoir. These data confirmed that rainbow trout standing crops have declined and brown trout populations increased up-reservoir. The experimental gill netting also indicated that rainbow trout populations in the inflow area are low but are of a larger size than elsewhere in the reservoir. The purse seine data indicated that Utah chub were the most numerous species in the inflow and open areas. Chub pound- age per surface acre in these two areas was greater than for all other species combined. Rainbow trout continue to be the dominant fish in the canyon environment. No Utah chubs under 200 mm total length were taken during the purse seine operations indicating close correlation with gill nets set in mid-reservoir. During special work in 1971 to establish the location of the larger Utah chubs, experimental gill nets were set in water 9. 1 - 10.7 m (30 - 35 ft.) deep. The chub catch averaged about 230 mm in total length; average length of chubs from the purse seine was 246 mm. Data from purse seine activities (Table IV) indicated low standing crops of brown trout in pelagic waters. Creel data and gill netting information support this observation. GaUN IIVH ILACKJ fOall aMa inflow area IUCklOAID t 0 ,,..,.,..,.,.. t open hills area WYOMING UTAH canyon area FIGURE 1 FLAMING GORGE RESERVOIR Table III. Catch per gill net hour at Flaming Gorge Reservoir, 1974.with total gill net hours in parentheses. Species Canyon Open Hills Inflow ( 123.0) (100.8) ( 120.3) Rainbow trout 0.56 0.37 0.37 Brown trout 0.03 0.09 0.26 Utah chub 3.20 2.42 3.35 Flannel mouth sucker 0.24 0.31 0.16 White sucker 0.65 0.39 1.18 Mountain whitefish 0.03 0.08 0.01 other l 0.01 0.02 0.01 l Includes cutthroat trout, roundtail chub, carp, and mountain sucker. Page 5 I T ab le I V . Su m m ar y o f p u rs e se ~ n in g s ta ti s ti c s , F lw ni ng G or ge R es er v o ir , 19 74 . S p ec ie s N um be r p e r su rf ac e ac re .A ve ra ge l en g th o f fi sh (m m ) P ou nd s p e r S U ff ac e ac re C an yo n O pe n In fl o w T o ta l I ,C an yo n O pe n ,In fl o w M ea n C an yo n O pe n In fl o w M ea a '1 R ai nb ow 2 8 .1 1 2 .0 2 .3 1 2 .2 28 2 33 4 37 0 33 0 1 3 .8 1 0 .3 I 2 ,7 8 .3 B ro w n 0 .3 b .8 o. 4 I 37 9 29 7 , 27 4 o .6 0 .5 0 .3 I C u tt h ro at 0 .1 0 .1 0 .1 31 7 33 1 '1 I 32 4 0 .1 0 .1 t M ac ki na w 0 .1 t 44 3 0 .2 t I W h it ef is h 0 .1 t I I 36 2 I 36 2 I t U ta h ch ub 1 4 .l 46 ,,l 1 4 .4 2 7 .l 23 7 24 3 26 2 24 6 5 .9 1 8 .1 7 .5 1 1 .l I F la nn el m ou th 0 .1 t 45 0 45 0 I 0 .2 0 .1 t I I I t - Re p re se n ts f ig u re s le ss t h an 0 .1 . i 0\ Segment Objective: Page 7 Most of the brown trout harvested are apparent]¥ taken in near-shore waters. Gill netting in 1973 in deep waters in the inflow area indicated that brown trout could be - taken by fishing deeply- during the summer. One net set at- Sage Creek took 30 brown trout ranging in weight from 2.3 to 5.5 kg (5 to 12 pounds). Stocking of Flaming Gorge Reservoir contined during 1974 (Table V. ). Advanced fingerling trout (127 mm TL) stocked from March through June comprised virtually al1 of the 2,717,249 fishes planted. Stocking rates were 60 rainbow and 13 brown trout per acre. Rainbow trout were stocked primariJ.¥ in the canyon and open hills areas while brown trout were stocked in the inflow area. Stocking methods included planting barges to facilitate dispersal and direct plants at boat ramps and other access points. Distribution rates by area were canyon, 13.8-percent; open hills, 66.0 percent; and inflow, 20.2 percent. A total of 104,779 pounds of trout were stocked during 1974. Threadfin shad were s~ocked as eggs during 1974 in a manner similar to past years (Starostka, Nielson, and Stone, 1974). Approximate]¥ nine million eggs were transferred from Lake Powell to Flaming Gorge. Water temperatures at Flaming Gorge were much cooler (10° C, 49° F) than optimum (21° C, 70° F). Survival of these eggs was doubtful. No largemouth bass were stocked in l974. 3. Determine the status of fish food supplies and their utilization by fish. Rainbow and brown trout continue to exhibit similar feeding preferences to those described in previous years (Wiley, 1969). Primary foods of smaller rainbow trout are zoopla.nk- ton and aquatic insects (Table VI). Fish are utilized extensively by rainbow trout wer 330 mm ( 13 in.). uta.h chub and mottled sculpin were the dominant fish identified in rainbow stomachs. Fish continued to be the primary food item of brown trout wer 203 mm (8 in.) TL (Table VII). Of the identifiable fish remains, Utah chub were most common but trout remains were more prevalent in stomachs after stocking. Aquatic insects and zooplankton followed fish in frequency of occurrence in the stomachs of brown trout. Growth of rainbow trout random]¥ sampled from the creel continues to be excellent (Table VIII). Rainbow trout growth during the period 1969 through 1973 is very similar to the 1963 - 1969 period (Varley1 1971). Growth continues to be most rapid in the shallow, relativezy eutrophic, inflow area and slowest in the deep, oligotrophic canyon area. Mean condition factors (total length) ranged from 1.01 in the canyon to 1.03 in the inflow. Page 8 Table V. - Fish stocking summary by species and agency for Fla.ming Gorge Reservoir, 1974. Agency F & ws1 Utab Wyoming_ Total F & WS Wyoming Total Utab Species RBT2 RBT RBT RBT BNT3 ENT BNT No. Planted 1,150,088 521,854 495,326 2,167,268 262,381 287,600 549,981 Lbs. Planted 39,946 24,819 16,868 81,633 12,494 10,652 23,146 Estimated nine million eggs 1. Fish and Wildlife S~rvice, Jones Hole National Fish Hatchery 2. Rainbow trout. 3. Brown trout. 4. Threadfin shad. No./lb. 25.9 21.0 29.4 25.1 21.0 27.0 23.8 T a b l. e V I. P e rc e n t o c c u rr e n c e o f fo o d it em s b y si z e g ro up i n t h e s to m ac hs o f ra in bo w t ro u t in F la m in g G or g e Re se rv o ir , 19 74 . I '1 T o ta l L en gt h Fo od It em 20 0 20 1- 25 0 1 25 1- 30 0 30 1- 35 0 35 1- 40 0 40 .1- 45 0 45 1- 50 0 50 1- 55 0 55 1- 60 0 60 1- 65 0 7? 0 O rg an ic d eb ri s 60 .0 50 .0 52 .9 I 81 .0 50 .0 25 .0 50 .0 Z oo pl an kt on 80 .0 77 ,8 I 70 .6 42 .9 41 .7 25 .0 '1 A q u at ic In se ct s ' 20 .0 9. 7 11 .8 1 33 .3 16 .i7 :J -0 0. 0 11 .8 8 .3 I F is h 9, 5 50 .0 50 .0 I 10 0. 0 10 0. 0 10 0. 0 I '1 M ol lu sc 1 .4 5. 9 4. 8 S am pl e S iz e 5 72 17 2 1 1 2 4 2 1 1 1 11 ', i \0 T ab le V II . I P er ce n t o cc u rr en ce o f fo od i te m s b y s iz e g ro up i n t h e s to m ac hs o f br ci w n tr o u t, F la m in g G or ge R es er v o ir , 19 74 . I - - - - - -- T o ta l L en gt h It em 25 1- 30 0 30 1- 35 d 35 1- 40 0 40 1\ '"4 50 45 1- 50 0 50 1- 55 0 55 1- 60 0 60 1- 65 0 70 0 I I I I O rg an ic d eb ri s 42 .9 26 .7 9 .1 Z oo pl an kt on 28 .6 20 .0 50 .0 A q u at ic rn se ct s 14 .3 ,3 3. 3 I T e rr e st ri a l rn se ct s 14 .3 F is h 28 .6 50 .0 1 0 0 .0 10 0. 0 1 0 0 .0 I 10 0. 0 1 0 0 .0 10 0. 0 M ol lu sc s ·3 3. 3 I I I S am pl e S iz e 7 15 2 3 4 11 I 4 4 3 I , l (1) b Page 11 Table VIII. Mean back-calculated total length of rainbow trout by area, Flaming Corge Rese;rvoir. - - CANYON AREA Year Sample Mean calculated T.L. (mm) at each annulus rlass Size 1 2 3 - 4 1972 198 246 1971 305 233 347 1970 331 241 - 323 540 1969 366 246 333 394* Mean calculated total length 242 334 - 467 --- No. of trout 997 392 10 OPEN HILLS 1972 186 264 - 1971 139 278 350 1970 220 272 373 392 1969 423 273 356 466 484 Mean calculated total length 272 360 429 484 No. of trout - 1898 545 33 2 INFLOW 1972 179 281 1971 113 263 364 1970 92 280 402 399 1969 251 276 407 433 Mean calculated total length 275 391 416 No. of trout 518 121 6 Page 12 Table IX. Mean back-calculated total length of brown trout, Fla.ming Gorge Reservoir. Year Class 1972 1971 1970 1969 Mean -calculated total length No. of trout Sample Size 22 15 29 118 Mean calculated 1 2o6 302 281 284 268 184 2 346 398 336 - 360 52 T.L. (mm) at each annulus 3 4 453 458 563 20 6 -- Segment Objective: Page 13 Brown trout continued to exhibit rapid growth through 1972 (Table IX), similar to the 1964 - 1971 mean reported by Varley (1971). Ccmdition factors (total length) _ranged from 1. 00 _to 1. 02 reservoir_ wide. GREEN RIVER 4. Determine the magnitude and nature of the annual fish ha.vest. During 1974 creel clerks censused 8.2 percent of the estimated use and examined 5.9 percent of the estimated harvest. Analysis of these data indicates that angler use and effort decreased below 1973 levels by 5.0 percent and 19.6 percent, respectively, to the lowest levels since 1966 (Table X). An estimated- total of 16,731 angler dEzys and 56,757 angler hours were expended in harvesting 36,117 trout. The creel rate increased substantially from 0.39 to 0.64 fish per hour, resulting :in a 23.4 percent increase in the total harvest over 1973 (Table X). This improved creel rate appeared to be due, in part, to both lower daily flows on the river a.nd a reduced sediment discharge from Red Creek during the fishing season. 'Concurrently the catch rate, which includes both trout returned to the water and those creeled, increased from 0.81 to 0.96 fish per hour ( Table XII) • During 1974 the average angler released one trout for evecy two creeled. 'flle average size trout harvested decreased from 356 mm (14.o in.) and 499 g (1.1 lbs.) in 1973 to 284 mm (11.2 in.) in 1974, the smallest average size since 1965 ( Table X) . · To compare annual trends, measurements of rainbow trout harvested since 1967 were arbitrarily grouped into three size classes: less than 12 inches, 12 to 16 inches, and over 16 inches (Table XIII). During 1974 fish larger tha.n 16 inches constituted only 4.9 percent of the harvest, while fish less than 12 inches canprised 70.8 percent. Such a substantial reduction in average size may have been related to a significant popula.ticm change, or a reducticm in the acceptable size of fish harvested by the average angler. Angler use by raft and combination raft-shore fishermen has increased substantially since 1967. During 1974, 1.o percent of the total angler days were expended by ~ft-associated anglers (Table XIV). Use by ncm-angling rafts has also increased since 1967. During 1974 56.1 percent of the rafts included floaters seeking other recreational activities besides angling. 'flle demands for raft-associated recreation has increased year]¥ since 1970. During 1974 total raft traffic increased 32.1 percent over the 1973 level, to an estimated 9,014 rafts (Table XV). I T ab le X . Su m m ar y o f fi sh er y s ta ti st ic s f( J'J ' th e G re en R iv er , 19 64 -1 97 4. C at eg or y 19 64 19 65 19 66 19 67 19 68 19 69 19 70 19 71 19 72 19 73 1 19 74 - - T o ta l A ng le r D ay s 2, 90 0 8, 20 0 ll ,9 0 0 27 ,8 00 34 ,9 00 25 ,6 oo I 29 ,4 50 16 ,8 67 23 ,8 66 17 ,6 09 1 16 ,7 31 A n gl er H ou rs 8, 90 0 21 ,3 00 39 ,4 00 12 4, 40 0 12 4, 50 0 79 ,3 00 10 9, 63 0 I 59 ,3 02 92 ,1 50 70 ,5 65 56 ,7 57 I I T ro ut H ar ve st 8, 10 0 17 ,0 00 I 39 ,2 00 71 ,2 00 62 ,4 00 21 ,3 00 43 ,4 00 22 ,4 20 50 ,3 65 27 ,6 71 3 6 ,l l7 I C re el R at e 0. 91 0. 79 o. 74 0 .5 7 0, 50 0 ,2 7 0 .3 9 0. 38 0. 55 0 ,3 9 I o. 64 C at ch R at e -- -- -- -- I -- 0. 32 0. 58 I 0 ,5 9 0 .9 9 0 .8 1 0. 96 A ve . S iz e T ro ut C re el ed ( in ch es ) 10 .2 1 0 .7 12 .5 13 .4 13 .6 15 ,2 1 1 .6 12 .3 1 2 .6 14 .o I ll .2 A ve . W t. T ro ut C re el ed ( L b s. ) 0. 50 0 ,5 7 o. 84 1 .0 1 1 ,0 7 1 .4 0 0. 70 0 .8 1 0 .9 2 l, ll 0 .6 7 T o ta l Lb s . Y ie ld 4, 05 0 9, 69 0 32 ,9 28 71 ,9 12 66 ,7 68 29 ,8 20 I 30 ;3 80 18 ,1 6o 46 ,3 36 30 , 7 15 1 24 ,1 98 L bs . Y ie ld /s . A .* 5 .5 13 .2 4 4 .8 97 ,8 90 .8 4 0 .6 4 1 .3 2 4 .7 6 2 .9 4 1 .8 32 ,9 I I I N o. Y ie ld /s . A . ll 24 53 85 29 I 59 30 69 37 49 97 ' I A ng le r H rs ./ s. A . 13 29 53 16 9 16 9 lo 8 14 9 81 12 5 97 1 77 A ng le r D a: ys /s . A . 4 ll 16 38 I 47 35 41 I 23 I 32 24 23 *B as ed a n an e st im at ed 7 35 a cr es i n t h e u ta h p o rt io n o f th e T ai lw at er s. "1 3 Q i O Q In ..... .:, .. . I ab le X I. A h is to ry o f th e st oc ki ng a nd m ar ki ng o f fi sh es i n t h e Fl am in g G cr ge -G re en R iv er T ai lw a. te rs , 19 63 -1 97 4. I ,e ci es S to ck ed 19 63 19 64 19 65 19 66 19 67 19 68 19 69 19 70 19 71 19 72 19 73 I 19 74 · 1 .in b aw F in ge rl in gs 42 ,9 61 13 4, 51 8 42 3, 34 1 99 ,2 00 16 1, 00 0 50 3, 00 0 58 6, 00 0 85 1, 97 7 ' -- -- 31 3: 62 81 0 .i nb ow A dv . F in ge rl in gs -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 30 1: 29 5 24 4, 68 o 37 5, 30 51 0 .in b ow S U bc a. tc ha bl e -- -- -- -- 8 00 4 -- -- -- -- -- I 1in bo w C at ch ab le 1. 8, 90 0 7, 53 0 18 ,8 oo -- -- -- 28 ,1 62 19 ,8 34 7 22 ,9 70 34 ,9 97 25 ,9 23 19 ,0 00 l.8 ,8 oo I I I - - ·o w n F in ge rl in g -- -- -- . -- -- -- -- tt th ro at F in ge rl in g: -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 76 ,0 00 10 :0 00 6 -- 79 :0 58 Ltt h ro at F in ge rl in g3 -- -- -- -- i: 47 92 5: 13 ~ 4: 59 52 -- 40 ,2 67 24 9, 78 2 ,tt h ro at B ro od s to ck l -- ' -- -- -- 1, 81 2 l, 58 o I 'O Ok F in ge rl in g -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 23 ,0 00 I 64 ,5 66 9 ·o o k C at ch ab le -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 28 8 "S .y lin g F in ge rl in g -- -- -- I -- -- -- -- 46 ,7 00 37 ,1 00 -a yl in g C at ch ab le s -- -- -- -- -- I -- -- - - I 95 5 ;o ck in g D en si ty :l l _n ge rl in g/ A cr e( lb s. /a cr e) 58 .4 18 3. 0 60 1. 8 13 4. 9 24 4. 6 68 4. 6 79 7. 2 13 57 .4 15 1. 9 54 .7 10 7. 6 1 33 9. 8 (3 .6 ) (5 .9 ) I (1 .4 ) (2 .4 ) I (1 7. 1) (1 7. G ) (2 9 i6 ) (2 .5 ) (2 .1 ) (5 .3 ) 16 .6 ) lv an ce F in ge rl in g/ A cr e -- -- -- -- -- I - - -- -- -- 33 2. 9 51 0. 6 42 6. 7 '1 • (1 7. 3) (3 0. 4) (3 2 .4 ) 1b ca tc ha bl es / A cr e -- -- -- -- -- -- -- -- 40 9. 9 -- -- (2 7. 3) I it ch .a b le s/ A cr e 25 .7 10 .2 25 .6 I -- 3. 1 7 .0 6 .2 40 .6 30 .8 31 .2 47 .6 35 .2 (5 .3 ) (8 .o ) (2 .4 ) I (7 .0 ) (6 .2 ) (1 0 18 ) ( 1 3. 4) (5 ).2 ) (1 6. 4) (1 0. 8) >s . St oc ke d (t o ta l) -- 6, 53 2 10 ,2 21 1, 03 3 3, 52 7 17 ,6 98 17 ,o 67 I 29 ,o 67 29 ,7 07 31 ,7 67 21 ,0 11 38 ,3 22 I )S , S to ck ed /S . A . -- 8 .8 13 .9 1 .4 4 .8 23 .8 23 .2 I, 39 .5 4o .4 43 .2 28 .6 5 2 .l JS . Y ie ld L s, A . -- 5. 5 13 .2 44 .8 97 ,8 90 .8 40 .6 41 .3 24 .7 62 .9 41 .8 1 32 .9 I Y el lo w st on e ( S he ep C re ek -s tr aw be rr y~ S tr ai n I 7. 81 2 Y el lo w D ar t'i T ag ge d, 59 0 A n al q u p ,' 'O Y el lo w st on e (S he ep C re ek -s tr aw be rr y S tr ai n I 8 . 5, 00 0 A di po se C li p 1 ~ O Q Sn ak e R iv er C ut th ro at • I 9 . 15 ,0 00 A di po se C li p , 12 ,2 00 D ou bl e P el vi c C li p (I ) S pa gh et ti T ag ( nu m be re d, y el lo w ) 10 . Fl .u ar es ce nt -D ye M ar ke d I .... 15 ,1 50 A di po se C li p 11 . B as ed o n th e es ti m at ed 7 35 a cr es i n t h e u ta h p or ti on o f th e V , 11 ,5 00 R ig ht P el vi c C li p I T ai lw a. te rs . • 1 I I I I '1 Page 16 During 1974, 87.4 percent of the angler use and 85.4 percent of the ha.rvest occurred during the suzmner months (June through August) while 12.6 percent of the use a.nd 14.6 percent of the harvest occurred during the fa.ll months (September through November). -Since 1968, the seasonal distribution of angler use and harvest has remained relatively constant. Non-resident use comprised 22.0 percent of the total on the tailwaters in 1974 (Table XVI). Dispite fluctuations -in total- use on the ta.ilwaters, non-resident use has remained relatively constant since 1969, constituting approximately 25.0 percent. Since 1968 the bullt of the non-resident use has shifted from the upper to lower section of the river. Use on the lower section has fluctuated_ between_l7.8 and 28.3 percent of the total tailwater use; while use by nan-residents has increased _ to 39.8 _percent, _showing _that non-::.resident_ use has _ increased faster than overall use in the area.. Angling use in the upper section has remained more constant, varying from 71.6- to 82.2 -percent o:t'--the whole tailwa;fer use; -- while non-resident use dropped from 31.3 percent in 1971 to 15.7 percent in 1974. During 1974 non-resident use cansituted 33.8 percent of the total use on the lower section from Little Hole to the Colorado bo~der and only 15.7 percent of the total use on the upper section. Creel census data collected along the entire tailwaters were projected for an estimated harvest of 36,ll7 trout _consisting of 34,-564 rainbow (95.1- percent), 1,264 - cutthroat (3.5 percent, 188 brown (0.5 percent and 101 brook trout (0.3 percent~. No catches of greyling were reported during 1974. On an area. basis, the highest percent of rainbow trout and brown trout harvest occurred in Brown's Park, while proportionately more cutthroat and brook trout were harvested between the ta.ilrace and Little Hole. Species composition of the harvest from 1965 - _1974 is summarized in Table XVII. _ An estimated 24,198 pounds (10,886 kg) of trout were harvested during 1974, yielding 32.9 pounds per surface a.ere (Table X), a 27.4 percent decrease from the 11 year average of 45.0 pounds (20.4 kg). The tailwa.ter fishery has been maintained by stocking several trout species at varying densities and size combinations (Tables XI and XII). Since 1963 fingerling trout have been stocked at densities ranging from 55 to 1,357 per surface acre, advanced finger- ling trout have been stocked a.t densities ranging from 55 to 1,357 per surface acre, advanced fingerlings from 333 to 511, subca.tchables at 410, and catchables ..from 6 to 48 ( Table XI). Comparing the total weight stocked with the estimated weight harvested shows a net loss for two years following the initial stocking. From 1966 through 1970 there was a yearly net gain ranging from 93.0 lbs. in 1967 to 1.1 lbs. per a.ere in 1970. Since 1971 (except for 1972 and 1973) there has been a yearly deficit ranging from 10.3 to 26.9 lbs. per acre. Page l.7 Table XII. A comparison of catch and creel rates (fi~h per hoE?"), Gre~ River - Tail.waters, 1969-1974. - - Category 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 - Catch Rate 0.32 0.58 0.59 0.99 0.81 0.96 Creel Rate 0.27 0.39 0.38 0.55 0.39 o.64 - Percent Difference 15.6 32.8 35.6 44.5 51.9 44.4 Table XIII. Size group composition in percent of the rainbow trout harvest, Green River Tail.waters, 1967-1974. Category 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 Less Than 12" 25.4 28.8 17.8 51.2 50.9 34.5 45.6 70.8 12" to 16" 54.1 48.0 51.1 21.0 33.3 43.4 24.8 24.3 Greater Than 16" 20.5 23.2 31.1 21.8 15.8 22.l 29.6 4.9 Sample Size 268 125 225 326 375 ll3 145 568 Table XIV. Comparison of raft and shore angling use, effort and harvest, Green River Tail.waters, (%), 1967-1974. -- Category 1967 1968 1969 l.970 1971 1972 1973 1974 RF"!' SHR RF"!' SHR RFJ' SHR RF.I' SHR RPI' SHR RF.I' SHR RPI' SHR RPI' SHR Angl.er Days Angler Hours Harvest 36 64 45 55 61 39 42 58 43 57 47 53 41 59 44 56 46 54 60 40 62 38 61 39 44 56 49 51 45 55 41 59 41 59 42 58 51 49 53 47 57 43 68 32 69 31 66 34 Page 18 ~le XVIII. Percent distribution of use (angler deys) on the Green River Tailwaters, (angler days in parenthesis), 1967-1974. tegory 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1~er (25,826) (27,313) (21,021) (23,031) (13,o48) (17,ll6). (12,891) ection 92.9 78.2 82.1 78.2 77.4 71.6 73.2 iver (1,974) (7,587) (4,579) (6,419) (3,819) (6,750 (4,718) ection 7.1 21.8 17.8 21.8 22.6 28.3 26.8 - ca.l Angler Days 27,800 34,900 25,600 29,450 16,867 23,866 17,609 1974 (12,736) 76.1 (3,995) 23.9 16,731 r I Page 19 Taple XV. Campa.risen of fishing and non-fishing raf't classification, Green River Tail~ters, 1967-1974. _ _ _ _ _ Category 1967 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972 1973 1974 - - - - - - Fishing_ Rafts - - - - - - - - - {percent) 95.2 85.4 68.8 62.7 52.4 49.3 56.0 43.9 - --- - -Nan-Fishing Raf'ts - - (percent) 4.8 24.6 31.2 37.2 47.6 50.7 44.o 56.1 Estimated Total Rafts 3,084 5,030 4,519 6,331 4,184 4,818 6,200 9,014 Table XVI. Percent distribution of resident and non-resident fisherman use (angler days), on the Green: River Tailwaters, 1968-19'74. Category 1968 1969 1970 1971 1972* 1973 1974 - UEI?er Section 82.6 68.9 71.7 84.3 Res. 79.3 71.1_ --- Non-Res. 20.7 - 17.4 28.9 31.1 28.3 15. 7 -- Lower Section Res. 97.0 88.9 86.6 87.2 -- 60.2 66.2 Non-Res. 3.0 ll.l 13.4 12.8 -- 39.8 33.8 Total River Res. 75.2 74.o 72.0 76.o -- 75.2 88.o Non-Res. 14.8 26.0 28.0 24.o -- 24.8 22.0 1~No Data Collected. .. -- Page 20 I, Table XVII. Percent species canposition of the harvest, Green River Tailwaters, 1965-1974. Category 1965 - 1966 1967 1968 - 1969 _ 1970 _1971 ..l.972 1973 Trai-lrace _- _- RBT 100.0 100.0 100.0 99.6 94.7 95.9 89.6 99.0 97.3 CTT -0- -0- -0- 0.3 4.6 4.1 5.8 0.7 1.6 BNT -0- -0- -0- 0 • .1 0.7 -0- -0- 0.2 -0- BKT -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- 4.6 0.1 1.1 Little Hole RBT 100.0 100.0 98.6 97.0 87.5 96.0 92.4 98.8 97.2 _CTT -0- - -0- 1.2 - 2.8 11.6 3.8 4.6 o.6 J..8 mT -0- -0- 0.2 _ 0.2 - 0.2 - 0.2 _ o.4 - 0.5 ~o- BKT -0- -0- T -0- -0- -0- 2.6 0.1 1.0 Brown's Park RBT 100.0 99.1 95.0 87.6 90.4 95.1 97.6 99.7 90.7 CTT -0- -0- 4.4 10.0 8.8 2.7 1.2 -0- 5.5 BNT -0- 0.9 o.6 2.4 1.1 2.2 1.2 0.3 1.9 BKT -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- -0- 1.9 Total --Harvest RBT 100.0 100.0 98.9 96.0 91.0 97.5 92.4 99.0 97.0 I CTT -0- -0- 0.9 3.8 7.9 2.1 4.1 0.5 2.0 BNT -0- 0.l 0.1 0.2 1.1 o.4 o.4 0.1 0.2 IT: BKT -0- -0- T -0- -0- -0- 2.7 0.3 o.8 Trace - Less than 0.1 percent. 1974 94.6 5.4 -0- T 95.5 3.J. -0- 1.4 97.2 2.0 o.8 T 95.7 3.5 0.5 0.3 Segment Objective: Page 21 5. Determine size, composition, and trends of the fish populations and define movements and reproduction. - During 1974 a preliminary survey of the movement of fluor- escent-dyed rainbow trout fingerlings was initiated to evaluate the duration and extent of down-river movement. All 313,628 rainbow trout fingerlings (ave. 13.2/lb.) stocked in the Green River during the fall -of 1973 were mass marked with blue fluorescent dye and distributed by truck dumps at the tailrace and Little Hole. Movement of fish was moni t.ored by electroshocking and examinatiOil of angler creels along the tailwa.ters from the tailrace to the Gates of !adore, Dinosaur National _Monument, Colorado. Preliminary data indicate that-the fingerlings had dispersed appreciable distances down-river by the beginning of the fishing season. Per_cent of marked fish examined in angler creels decreased proportionatezy to the distance down-river. Several marked fish were examined near Brown's Park National Wildlife Refuge, Colorado, a distance of between 28 to 35 miles down- river from their initial stocking site. Work will continue in 1975 to collect additional information on movement, and a summary of these findings will be submitted as part of a later report. LITERATURE CITED Starostka, V.J., B. Neilson and R. Stone . 1973. Flaming Gorge Reservoir and the Green River Tailwaters. In. r.olorado River Drainage Reservoirs and tail- waters Fisheries Management, Investigations and Surveys. Annual Progress Report 1972-1973. Utah Division of Wildlife Resources, Salt Lake City, D. J . Project F-28-R-2. 27 pp. Varley, J., A.F. Regenthal and R.W. Wiley. 1971. Growth of rainbow trout in Fla.ming Gorge Reservoir during the f i rst six years of i.mpoundment. -I!!.:_ Reservoir Fisheries and Limnology speci_al publication no..! 8. American Fisheries Society. pp. 121-136. -- Wiley, R.W. 1972. Analysis of food identified from the stomachs of rainbow and brown trout from Flaming Gorge Reservoir, 1964 through 1969. Game and Fish r.ommission Administrative report . 8 pp. Wyoming Archives AH_:>roval N\.lllber: 7600055 LITERATURE CITED Starostka, V.J., B. Neilson and R. Stone. 1973. Flaming Gorge Reservoir and the Green River Tailwaters. In. rolorado River Drainage Reservoirs and tail- waters Fisheries Management, Investigations and Surveys. Annual Progress Repo~t 1972-1973. Utah Divisi<:>n of' Wildlife Res_ources, Salt Lake_ City, D.J. Project F-28-R-2. 27 pp. Varley, J., A.F. Regenthal and R.W. Wiley. 1971. Growth of rainbow trout in Flaming Gorge Reservoir during the f i rst six years of' impoundment • .!!l:_ Reservoir Fisheries and Limnol9gy spec'l:_al publi~ation no~ 8 . American Fisheries Society. pp. 121-136. Wiley, R.W. 1972. Analysis of' food identified from the stomachs of rainbow and brown trout from Flaming Gorge Reservoir, 1964 through 1969. Wyoming Game and Fish r.ommission Administrative report. 8 pp. Archives AI;proval Nunber: 7600055
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Content: 889bdb2cb95b73684df45cc85b064b6de0b4a8eb | Abstract: 81537e6326af8f121ce2c764cbbf10e32c0bb138